October is National Arts and Humanities Month

National Arts and Humanities Month (NAHM) is a coast-to-coast collective recognition of the importance of culture in America. It is designed to encourage all Americans to explore new facets of the arts and humanities in their lives, and to begin a lifelong habit of active participation in the arts and humanities.

Creative Conversations

From hosting a Creative Conversation or arts center open house to securing a mayoral proclamation or better newspaper coverage of the arts, people in every community across the United States can celebrate NAHM by helping recognize the contributions of cultural organizations in their region.

The Arts help us grapple with tough questions
Throughout history, the arts and humanities have helped men and women around the globe grapple with the most challenging questions and come to know the most basic truths.  In our increasingly interconnected world, the arts play an important role in both shaping the character that defines us and reminding us of our shared humanity.  This month, we celebrate our Nation’s arts and humanities, and we recommit to ensuring all Americans can access and experience them.

Creative Conversations Map

Last year, more than 1,800 individuals participated in 52 locally hosted Creative Conversations throughout the country.  Those leaders continue to be engaged at the national level.  Creative Conversations are local gatherings of engaged citizens in communities across the country and are part of a grassroots movement to elevate the profile of arts in America during National Arts & Humanities Month every October. There’s a cool map and day-by-day linked event listing with a by-state option that includes Oklahoma. Check it out!

Screenshot of the Creative Conversations Map | National Arts and Humanities Month | 2011

Moments in the Arts Oklahoma Arts Leaders Won’t Forget
Later this month, in celebration of the arts and humanities in Oklahoma, we will feature a series of themed guest posts, “A Moment in the Arts I Won’t Forget” from Oklahoma arts and cultural leaders.